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Pass the remote! 8 great things to watch this week

Killing Eve is back, Amanda Seyfried wields ambition like a knife, and iconic 60s espionage gets a fresh revival. It's all happening on the box this week!

PICK OF THE WEEK: Killing Eve, BBC iPlayer, 28 Feb

Everyone’s favourite high fashion sexy spy thriller is back for its final season, with its fourth and final new showrunner at the helm. It remains doomed to chase the high of its first series, struggling to quite make sense of its own plot, but still boasts fantastic performances from Sandra Oh and Jodie Comer. Plus, enough of the characteristic witty, mysterious moments and killer fashion to keep us seeing it through.

Murder In Provence, Britbox, 1 March

Zut alors, there’s been a murder in the picture-book city of Aix-en-Provence! But don’t cancel your summer holiday just yet; Endeavour’s Roger Allam and Father Brown’s Nancy Carroll are on the case as a crime-solving married couple. Based on the books by ML Longworth, this is a cosy, aesthetically-pleasing crime show. Nothing ground-breaking: just a good time (and a murder…).

Rock Till We Drop, BBC2, 1 March

Not enough left-field reality TV premises in your life? Here’s a fun one. Spandau Ballet bassist Martin Kemp and grime artist Lady Leshurr join forces to rally a group of talented amateur rock musicians — who, crucially, are all over 64 — into performing at the Isle of Wight Festival. The message of living beyond your youth is a nice one, but it’s mostly just a fun dose of funky characters no longer in their salad years revving up to rock.

Writing With Fire, BBC4, 2 March

Oscar-nominated and the winner of two Sundance awards, this documentary follows the work of the staff of India’s digital newspaper Khabar Lahariya, entirely run by Dalit (‘low caste’) women. Their journalism is rousing, invigorating, calm in the face of danger (corrupt police, violent leaders, you name it), and changing the face of India’s media today.

Your Body Uncovered, BBC2, 2 March

Broadcaster Kate Garraway heads this high-tech medical show that uses VR to illustrate and explain long-term health conditions. Garraway has spoken openly about caring for her husband, who still requires 24-hour care after catching Covid in March 2020, so cuts an empathetic figure alongside Dr Guddi Singh as they meet struggling patients.

The Dropout, Disney+, 3 March

Amanda Seyfried is a world away from Mamma Mia in this series about Elizabeth Holmes. (America’s youngest self-made female billionaire, Holmes is currently facing prison for reasons that will unfold in the show.) Not that she wasn’t a likeable ABBA mouthpiece, Seyfried is brilliant here as a dangerously ambitious head of a health technology company. It’s powerful, engaging stuff: Holmes drops out of Stanford to start Theranos, a blood-testing company that ultimately falls short – and that’s an understatement. Stephen Fry also stars.

The Ipcress File, ITV, 6 March

Len Deighton’s spy novel, previously an iconic 1965 film starring Michael Caine, gets a new adaptation with Peaky Blinders‘ Joe Cole as our central protagonist, Harry Palmer. After being imprisoned for dodgy dealings in Berlin, he’s approached by the British secret service and pulled into a world of espionage that’s somewhat at odds with his working class background. Expect six episodes of atmospheric, gripping spy plot and 60s style.

Misbehaviour, BBC2, 6 March

Keira Knightley, Jessie Buckley (Wild Rose; Fargo), and Gugu Mbatha-Raw (Belle; Loki) star in this comedy-drama true story about feminist protestors at the 1970 London Miss World contest. Released in March 2020, its cinema run was cut short by the virus-y elephant in the room. Which is a shame, since it’s a charming watch that nicely balances the protestors’ strength of purpose with the silly nature of their actions (i.e., covering Bob Hope in flour), as well as the nuanced touch of power beauty pageants offered women of colour.

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