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What’s in: 10 new things to watch this week

Lazy day in front of the telly? Yes please! Here are the hottest new films and TV shows for you to sink your teeth into. Just add popcorn.

Ad Astra (Sky Cinema)

Feeling like you want to escape planet Earth for a couple of hours? Hell yeah. Brad Pitt stars in sci-fi blockbuster Ad Astra, that’s just been added to Sky Cinema, about an astronaut who travels to the edge of the solar system to find his missing father and save the planet. If Brad isn’t enough to entice you, the film also picked up an Oscar nomination. But for Best Sound Mixing. So… Brad it is.

Fear City: New York vs The Mafia (Netflix, 22 Jul)

If you enjoyed Netflix’s totally bonkers documentary Don’t F*** with Cats then you’ll be pleased to hear that the same creators are dropping a new docu-series this week: Fear City: New York vs The Mafia. The three-parter follows the ‘Five Families’ that ruled New York in the 1970s and 80s and their takedown by the FBI.

The Morning Show (Apple TV+)

Give the casting director a gold star because Jennifer Anniston and Reese Witherspoon starring side by side is a veritable treat (not forgetting funnyman Steve Carell). The 10-parter takes a candid look at the gender dynamics on the set of a US morning TV show and has been nominated for three Golden Globes. Definitely binge-worthy material.

The Secrets She Keeps (21 Jul, BBC One & BBC iPlayer)

The finale of this Aussie psychological thriller airs this week. Need a recap? Loosely based on the real-life kidnapping of baby Abbie Humphries from a hospital in Nottingham in the Nineties, the show stars Downton Abbey’s Laura Carmichael as Agatha, a lonely young woman who abducts the child of mummy blogger Meghan. No more spoilers – you can watch all episodes now on BBC iPlayer.

Glow Up: Britain’s Next Make-up Star (23 Jul, BBC Two)

Sometimes you just want to sit back with a glass of wine in hand and watch something totally frivolous – and this is just the ticket. A similar format to The Great British Bake Off and The Great British Sewing Bee and presented by the wonderful Stacey Dooley, Glow Up sees aspiring artists compete to become Britain’s next big thing in the beauty world, creating totally whacky and wonderful looks with make-up. You never know, you might pick up some tips.

Wonders of the Coast Path (23 Jul, ITV1)

Unless you’re lucky enough to live in a Muddy county with stunning coastline, then no doubt lockdown has had you dreaming of an ocean escape. ITV is doing its bit to sate your wanderlust with its newest show, presented by Good Morning Britain‘s Sean Fletcher, that takes a tour of Wales’s 870-mile coastal path that runs from Flintshire to the River Wye. I feel a staycation coming on…

Amadeus (National Theatre at Home, until 23 Jul)

Premiering at the National Theatre in 1979 (it picked up multiple Olivier and Tony awards and was then turned into an Oscar-winning 1984 film) this new production of Peter Shaffer’s play about the life of music prodigy Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart stars Lucian Msamati (Game of Thrones, His Dark Materials). The production features a live orchestral accompaniment by Southbank Sinfonia.

Radioactive (Amazon Prime Video, 24 Jul)

The life of Marie Curie gets the biopic treatment in this Amazon Prime original. With Rosamund Pike in the leading role, the film journeys through the double Nobel Prize-winning scientist’s life from her breakthrough discovery of radium and polonium to the tragic death of her husband.

A Suitable Boy (26 Jul, BBC One)

Based on Vikram Seth’s novel of the same name, A Suitable Boy stars Tanya Maniktala as passionate literature student Lata who falls for mysterious fellow student Kabir Durrani. The six-parter is the BBC’s first historical drama to feature no white characters and is set in 1951, in a newly independent India, against the backdrop of religious tensions in the wake of Partition and the country’s first democratic election.

Clemency (Curzon Home Cinema)

If you’re looking for something thought-provoking and gritty, this Sundance Grand Jury Prize-winning film, that’s just been added to Curzon’s movie reel, could be the one. Alfre Woodard portrays prison executioner Bernadine Williams who must confront the psychological demons her job creates as she befriends an inmate on death row.

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